Economy

Interview with Secretary Thomas Perez

Editor-in-Chief Justin Goss sits down with very special surprise guest, Secretary Thomas Perez of the U.S. Department of Labor. They discuss the jobs numbers post-recession, government’s response to the gig economy, and the importance of creating more post-secondary education opportunities. Be sure to subscribe to the Georgetown Public Policy Review Podcast on iTunes for more great…

Dodd-Frank and Wall Street Reform: What’s Next

The Financial Crisis of 2008 drew all eyes to the deep-seated systemic shortcomings of the American economy. Attempting to address these failures, President Obama enacted The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform Bill, and Consumer Protection Act in 2010. New rules and agencies were established to restructure weak firms, monitor risky behavior, and promote transparency. Six years…

India and China: Balancing Economic Growth with Climate Change Objectives

When forecasting the next 50 years, we see India and China leading the world economy with significant contributions to the world population and world income. According to the latest World Bank report, “Global Economic Perspectives” India will become the fastest growing developing country in the next two years and predicts it will grow at 7.9%…

The ACA in 2015

In September, the Census Bureau released data showing that the uninsured rate in the U.S. had decreased from 14.5 percent in 2013 to 11.7 percent in 2014.[1] After several years of very little change to that figure, the sudden drop has given proponents of the Affordable Care Act (ACA)  a reason to cheer amidst what…

Detroit is Not Enormous: Size, Revenue, and the City’s Ongoing Crisis

As the Detroit metropolitan region sprawled throughout the latter half of the twentieth century, the city’s physical boundaries remained unchanged. As a result, the city of Detroit is isolated from much of the wealth of the region and must either fund basic services through debt or choose to go without. In order to stabilize the city’s finances and alleviate the many crises that Detroit’s impoverished residents face, the broader metropolitan region should embrace a regional tax with revenues funneled to the central city. Unfortunately, Michigan’s response to Detroit’s financial crisis has been to undemocratically enforce austerity without addressing the city’s long-term revenue needs.

Beyond Urban Planning: The Economics of Capital Bikeshare

Bicycling is exploding across the United States, and Washington, DC is no exception: the share of bicycle commuters in the District has grown by 315 percent since 1990 and overall ridership rose 80 percent between 2007 and 2010. This growth is tied to the metro area’s commitment to expanding trails and bike lanes and, in large part, to the rapid expansion of Capital Bikeshare.